A Bridge Between Humanitarian Actors

Focus areas

Transforming our Network

While retaining our roots in principled humanitarian action we take full advantage of our collective diversity, the value we all bring, our proximity to people in crises and our collaborative advantage to increase our impact.

We commit to the following five transformations:

Transformation 1

Champion Principled Humanitarian Action...

ICVA is a champion of principled humanitarian action, advocating for the respect and protection of humanitarian space and supporting the effective, appropriate translation of principles into practice...
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Overview

ICVA is a champion of principled humanitarian action, advocating for the respect and protection of humanitarian space and supporting the effective, appropriate translation of principles into practice.

Humanitarian principles were created recognising the imperative for space to respond to civilian needs in times of conflict in a human, impartial, neutral, and independent manner. The rationale for their creation remains a powerful argument to demand continued respect for humanitarian action that is both distinct from and complementary to civil society ambitions for peace and development. ICVA will continue to be an advocate to protect and ensure respect for principled humanitarian action. We will drive and advocate the value of NGO influence to shape humanitarian space.

Humanitarian Principles

ICVA’s mission is to make humanitarian response more principled and effective, as its members believe that a rights-based approach, and operations and advocacy based on core humanitarian principles, will benefit people affected by disasters, conflict, and crises. Humanitarian Principles are therefore, fundamental to ICVA’s work with NGOs and other humanitarian stakeholders. ICVA advocates this perspective when dealing with various stakeholders including the UN Security Council, member states and NGOs.

The core humanitarian principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality and operational independence provide the foundations for humanitarian action. The principles are rooted in the Geneva Conventions and endorsed by the UN General Assembly as guidelines for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) and the many non-governmental organisations (NGOs) delivering humanitarian assistance.

Here is what each principle entails:

Humanity: Human suffering must be addressed wherever it is found. The purpose of humanitarian action is to protect life and health and ensure respect for human beings.

Neutrality: Humanitarian actors must not take sides in hostilities or engage in controversies of a political, racial, religious or ideological nature.

Impartiality: Humanitarian action must be carried out on the basis of need alone, giving priority to the most urgent cases of distress and making no distinctions on the basis of nationality, race, gender, religious belief, class or political opinions

Independence: Humanitarian action must be autonomous from the political, economic, military or other objectives that any actor may hold with regard to areas where humanitarian action is being implemented.

Commitment to these principles has also been expressed in the Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, and non-governmental organisations in disaster relief, and in the Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response of the Sphere Project.

ICVA works with NGOs and other humanitarian stakeholders to promote an active dialogue on humanitarian principles and help NGOs understand their application during crises and humanitarian response.

International Humanitarian Law

Humanitarian actors, with the lead of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), have been developing what is called International Disaster Response Law (IDRL) deriving from principles in International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and customary law principles. It aims at clarifying responsibilities and facilitated cooperation in situations of natural disasters. IDRL Guidelines are recommendations to governments on how to best structure their domestic laws relating to disaster management, and include guidance on coordination among organisations and governments, free passage of essential items and medical personel, and legal recognition of humanitarian organisations to operate. They are not legally binding, but serve to promote uniform legislation throughout countries to improve the response to natural disasters and facilitate fast and efficient recovery to an affected population.

ICVA regards this initiative as an important complementary component to IHL and has been involved in its development and promotion, including through co-hosting the International Dialogue on Strengthening Partnership in Disaster Response.

Overview: Civil Society Space

The unwarranted use of legal tools, misuse of power and politicisation of humanitarian aid by some governments and authorities has gradually and in some cases dramatically impacted civic space and the space for humanitarian action. It has also reduced the civic space in which people and NGOs can operate, including laws criminalising access to foreign funding and unduly limiting the scope of their permissible activities. Trends in nationalism have also been used as a rationale for limiting civic freedom. ICVA, our Secretariat and members, along with other civil society actors, will work strategically and collaboratively, advocating jointly to ensure an enabling environment for agile humanitarian response and in turn to promote civic space more generally.

For more information on civil society space or to join the civil society space working group, contact:

Ms Nishanie Jayamaha
Learning and Programme Coordinator
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Nishanie started her humanitarian career in Sri Lanka following the Indian Ocean Tsunami and has over 15 years of experience working in the United Nations, Government institutions (Secondment), the NGO and private sector in managerial and leadership roles.  Prior to joining ICVA in September 2017 she worked at the Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Protection (PHAP), the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) secretariat in Geneva and New York, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in Sri Lanka and Geneva, and at the Centre for Women’s Research (CENWOR) in Sri Lanka.

She has a Masters in International Relations from the University of Colombo and a Bachelor’s Degree in English, Sociology and Psychology from the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

Resources: Civil Society Space

NGO open letter
8 February 2021
Open Letter to States on Universal Access to COVID-19 Vaccines
Subject/ COVID-19 /
Open letter vaccines
Description

NGO Open Letter calling on States to step up multilateral efforts and lead a truly global response. It is in our common interest to ensure that priority in access to vaccine at a global level is given to those at a higher risk of infection and/or developing serious disease. Other priority considerations at national and global level will be counterproductive, leading to a perpetual spiral of new, vaccine-resistant variants of the virus.

Report
6 May 2020
The Future of Civil Society Organisations
Subject/ Civil society space /
Futures_Civil_Society_articles_2_Page_01
Description

Civil society space is increasingly a key issue for humanitarian organisations. It was the theme of the 2017 ICVA annual conference, and since then there are a growing number of crises where civil society actors have been denied access to a population in need. As a network, ICVA is grappling with the issues of erosion of humanitarian space, negative perceptions of civil society action by governments, and uncertain regulatory environments.

ICVA Paper
24 June 2019
Scoping study: civil society space in humanitarian action
Subject/ Civil society space / Learning /
2021-08-24_13-40-24
Description

The scoping study on civil society space in humanitarian action

How do NGOs Navigate the Shrinking Civil Society Space?

Civil Society organizations are operating in an increasingly restricted space, but this is also true for those working in Humanitarian Action. They face restrictions that limit freedoms of assembly and association. This webinar discusses what these limitations look like as well as highlighting ways that humanitarian agencies can better engage with audiences while navigating them.

This webinar will feature a panel discussion with experts to provide insight on the current state of civil society and how humanitarian NGOs can improve their engagement.

How do NGOs Navigate the Shrinking Civil Society Space?
10 September 2021
How do NGOs Navigate the Shrinking Civil Society Space?
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues / Learning /
190620-Change2-banner-1920
Description

This webinar is part of the “Navigating Change” Learning Stream which includes webinars, briefing papers, and other resources on how NGOs are managing changing global, regional, and national contexts for humanitarian response.

How do NGOs navigate the shrinking civil society space?
14 September 2021
FW- How do NGOs navigate the shrinking civil society space?
Subject/ Civil society space /
190620-Change2-banner-1920
Description

E-learning description for preview section

Webinar

Webinar
14 June 2019
How do NGOs navigate the shrinking civil society space?
Subject/ Civil society space /
Transformation 2

Address Impact of Climate Change on Humanitarian Action...

The scale and significance of climate change cannot be ignored. ICVA seeks to mitigate and adapt action to the increasing impact of climate change on humanitarian needs....
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Overview

Climate change is an existential threat that is already completely altering the work we do as humanitarian NGOs, and the lives of the people we support. ICVA engages through our selected work areas, working in collaboration and drawing on the wealth of knowledge and experience of ICVA members and our partner networks. We commit to creatively explore how the humanitarian, development and climate communities can work together to shape policy, increase resilience, improve practice, and secure resourcing for climate related humanitarian crises.

For more information on the Climate and Environment Charter or to join ICVA’s Climate and Environment working group, contact:

Ms Nishanie Jayamaha
Learning and Programme Coordinator
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Nishanie started her humanitarian career in Sri Lanka following the Indian Ocean Tsunami and has over 15 years of experience working in the United Nations, Government institutions (Secondment), the NGO and private sector in managerial and leadership roles.  Prior to joining ICVA in September 2017 she worked at the Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Protection (PHAP), the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) secretariat in Geneva and New York, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in Sri Lanka and Geneva, and at the Centre for Women’s Research (CENWOR) in Sri Lanka.

She has a Masters in International Relations from the University of Colombo and a Bachelor’s Degree in English, Sociology and Psychology from the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

Climate and Environment Charter for Humanitarian Organisations

The pledge on “Strengthening the resilience of communities to climate change and environmental degradation through climate-smart humanitarian action”, made at the 33rd International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent by the IFRC and the ICRC led to a consultative process to develop a new, succinct, accessible and aspirational Climate and Environment Charter that is open to the wider humanitarian sector for adoption in the spirit of the Code of Conduct of 1994.

ICVA is a core part of the Advisory Committee to the Climate and Environment Charter which included a number of humanitarian and climate actors.

The Advisory Committee to the Climate and Environment Charter developed a series of short and clear commitments that could guide our efforts as humanitarians in relation to limiting the impacts of climate change and environmental degradation on communities and reducing our own footprint. ICVA together with the ICRC, IFRC and the Advisory Committee conducted consultations on the draft of the Charter.

The Charter includes seven high-level commitments to guide the sector’s response to the climate and environment crises. These commitments will only be possible by embracing local leadership, increasing the capacity to understand climate and environment risks, and working together across and beyond the sector to mobilise even more ambitious climate action.

ICVA is a Signatory to the Charter and will continue our commitment in engaging on this theme through the “Ccommitment and Motion to Action” on Climate and Environment adopted by ICVA members at the General Assembly on 18-19 May 2021.

Sign the Charter

Carbon Accounting Tool

ICVA is part of a project together with ICRC, IFRC and many other organisations that aims to engage and collaborate with as many humanitarian organisations as possible to develop a shared standard and a tool to measure carbon emissions. Learning from existing tools already built, the group will jointly agree on how Green House Gass  (GHG) emissions should be measured in the humanitarian sector, and then a tool will be adapted/developed and freely offered to the sector, together with online training and a user guide. This project is envisioned to be the cornerstone for a sector-wide collaboration on reducing the negative footprint globally.

Climate Finance in Conflict and Fragile Settings

ICVA is a member of the expert roundtable working together to address obstacles to climate finance in conflict and fragile settings. The roundtable has been meeting bi-monthly and will focus on identifying why gaps and shortfalls in climate finance exist, the consequences of these shortfalls, and on proposing practical ways to unlock climate finance for populations that are particularly vulnerable to climate risks. This policy dialogue will provide a neutral, non-political space for expert discussions on ensuring that climate finance leaves no one behind. For those who would like to know more about this initiative, please do not hesitate to contact Nishanie Jayamaha nishanie.jayamaha@icvanetwork.org

ICVA Motion and Commitment to Action on Climate and Environment

ICVA is a Signatory to the Climate and Environment Charter. We will continue our commitment in engaging on this theme through the Commitment and Motion to Action on Climate and Environment adopted by ICVA members at the General Assembly of 18-19 May 2021.

ICVA Governance
26 May 2021
Commitment and Motion to Action on Climate and Environment
Subject/ ICVA /
Policy/Guidance
1 December 2018
ICVA Environmental Policy
Subject/ Environment /
ICVA Environmental Policy
ICVA strategy
12 July 2021
ICVA 2030 Strategy
Subject/ ICVA /
ICVA 2030
Description

This document sets the framework for the direction and focus of ICVA’s work from 2022-2030, as we evolve and transform our network. Rooting us more deeply in our mission of principled and effective humanitarian action, this strategy sets our collective values, our ways of working and our aspirational transformations. We will continue to work on focus areas which to best serve our members and the sector as a whole. Our added value is rooted in our work explaining & analysing, convening, brokering, influencing & advocating, supporting and collaborating.

This strategy was adopted members at the 18th General Assembly in May 2021.

For more information on the Climate and Environment Charter or to join ICVA’s Climate and Environment working group, contact: nishanie.jayamaha@icvanetwork.org

ICVA's Climate Change and Humanitarian Action E-learning

Learn more on ICVA’s Climate Change and Humanitarian Action learning stream

Climate Change and Humanitarian Action Learning Stream
30 September 2021
Climate Change and Humanitarian Action Learning Stream
Subject/ Learning / Cross-cutting issues /
210930-Climate0-banner-1920
Description

This learning stream provides a platform for the broader humanitarian community to better understand how we can reduce our impact of climate change by accelerating action and increasing environmental sustainability. The series focuses on practical ways of applying the Climate and Environment Charter for Humanitarian Organisations and sharing lessons learned on how the commitments can be translated into practice.

Topics covered in this webinar series include:

  • Maximising the environmental sustainability of our work
  • Adapting to the impacts of the climate and environmental crises
  • The Climate and Environment Charter for humanitarian organisations
Advocacy Initiatives

COP26 Engagement

The United Nations Climate Change Conference, commonly referred to as COP26 was held at the SEC Centre in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom from 31 October 2021 to 13 November 2021. During this conference more countries announced pledges to go carbon neutral, developed nations committed to increase funding to help low- and middle-income countries deal with damaging climatic effects, and world leaders promised to report their progress on emissions cuts every year.

ICVA members were engaged in the discussions and negotiations at COP-26. See below some of the key advocacy messages and resources from ICVA and other stakeholders.

Advocacy messages around COP26

Resource page
20 October 2021
English Statement on behalf of signatories to the Climate and Environment Charter for Humanitarian Organisations
Subject/ Climate & environment /
2021-10-20_18-20-23
Description
Resource page
3 November 2021
Statement by Principals of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) on Climate
Subject/ Climate & environment / Environment /
Resource page
20 October 2021
COP26 Advisory Group Messaging Flyer
Subject/ Climate & environment / Environment /
2021-10-20_17-29-59
Description
Transformation 3

Be Globally Distributed and Locally Rooted ...

ICVA is an international and diverse network leveraging our members direct engagement with people in crisis to provide leadership and to inform action at national, regional and global levels...
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Overview

ICVA will work at country, regional, and global levels to enable and support collaboration, strengthening accountability, social interaction, capacity, understanding and trust.

Introduction

Localization is the process through which a diverse range of humanitarian actors are attempting, each in their own way, to ensure local and national actors are better engaged in the planning, delivery and accountability of humanitarian action, while still ensuring humanitarian needs can be met swiftly, effectively and in a principled manner.

Localization creates an opportunity to critically examine and improve the overall structure and functionality of the humanitarian system by:

  1. Strengthening inclusion of, accountability to, and acceptance by affected populations
  2. Increasing resilience through linking preparedness, response and recovery efforts
  3. Enhancing the speed, quality and scale of humanitarian response
  4. Adding value through improving the efficiency and effectiveness of humanitarian action
  5. Promoting diversity and supporting innovative and contextual approaches
Resources on Localization

ICVA Paper
1 October 2019
ICVA Briefing Paper: Unpacking Localization
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues / Localization / Learning /
2021-08-24_13-01-07
Description

ICVA and the Humanitarian Leadership Academy have developed this paper to support local, national and international NGOs to ‘unpack’ localization in a constructive manner.

ICVA Paper
24 September 2018
Localization Examined: An ICVA Briefing Paper
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues / Localization / Learning /
2021-08-24_13-12-26
Description

This briefing paper is based on a review of documents as well as ICVA’s participation in ongoing localization-related evaluations, research, working groups, workshops and dialogues.

ICVA report
20 January 2021
Localization in Humanitarian Leadership
Subject/ Coordination / Middle East and North Africa region / Localization /
localisation in hum leadership
Description

Against the current background of sustaining local responses, ICVA initiated this research aiming at mapping and documenting the extent of effective and meaningful NNGOs engagement in international humanitarian coordination structures. Focusing in specific at MENA region, the research explores NNGOs engagement in Humanitarian Country Teams (HCTs), Country-Based Pooled Fund (CBPF) Advisory Boards, and sector or cluster coordination platforms. The contexts covered are Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, the occupied Palestinian territories, Syria (Damascus and Turkey-based operations as well as the Whole of Syria response), and Yemen. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative data, this research briefly profiles national leadership within the seven responses across MENA and outlines the state of NNGO engagement across the region.

Localization: Perspectives of Change

Many different groups have taken initiatives over the past few years to make the international humanitarian ecosystem more inclusive of local and national actors. This webinar explored the following questions:

  • What is localization, how has it evolved, and how does it currently work?
  • How do governments, non-state donors, private sector actors and diaspora see opportunities and challenges in localization initiatives?
  • What are ways to create sustainable assistance that reaches all people through principled humanitarian action?
Localization: Perspectives of Change
9 September 2021
Localization: Perspectives of Change
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues / Learning /
Localization
Description

This webinar explores how governments, private donors and the business community see current opportunities, trends as well as challenges.

The Humanitarian, Development and Peace Nexus

The “triple” nexus refers to the interlinkages between humanitarian, development and peace actors. Following the recommendations from the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS), the UN’s “new way of working”, Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), there has been a lot more reference to the “triple” nexus, and how the humanitarian, development and peace actors are expected to work towards collective outcomes over multiple years.

The 2018 ICVA Annual Conference and the Learning Stream webinars both focused on the Humanitarian, Development and Peace Nexus providing an opportunity for further discussions with actors on this topic.

Demystifying the Humanitarian, Development and Peace Nexus

Demystifying the Humanitarian, Development and Peace Nexus
19 August 2018
Demystifying the Humanitarian, Development and Peace Nexus
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues / Learning /
The-“nexus”-explained
Description

 

At the World Humanitarian Summit in 2016, the UN and World Bank have committed to a “new way of working” that transcends the humanitarian-development divide. This concept has been considered in terms of UN reform and the “triple nexus” – the nexus between humanitarian, development, and – when appropriate – peace. However, many NGOs and partners are yet to grapple with what this means for affected persons and the system as a whole.

This series includes webinars on the following topics:

  • The “nexus: explained: How and when do humanitarian, development, and peace action come together?
  • The World Bank and the humanitarian-development-peace nexus
  • The UN reform: The link to the “nexus” and what it means for non-UN actors
  • Perspectives of peacebuilding actors in the humanitarian-development-peace nexus
  • Donor perspectives on the humanitarian-development-peace nexus
Transformation 4

Be Diverse, Inclusive and Live our Values...

We aim to realise the full value of our diversity by being inclusive and fostering participation to ensure our relevance, legitimacy and impact as well as truly living our values...
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Overview

We proactively address issues of bias and racism both at the organisational and individual, personal level. We commit to protecting the rights of people and also to promoting best practices for safeguarding, ensuring protection from sexual exploitation and abuse (PSEA) and fulfilling a duty of care.

The ICVA membership seeks to represent the full diversity of NGOs and NGO networks engaged in humanitarian action. Our approach to membership will require us to be creative in exploring effective ways of including both formal and informal groups that are less structured, but still represent important voices that need to be heard.

Safeguarding: Advancing Protection from Sexual Exploitation, Abuse (PSEA) and Sexual Harassment in the Workplace (SHW)

Sexual exploitation and abuse of crisis affected populations and humanitarian staff by actors who provide aid is neither a new nor a standalone issue. However, since the media disclosure of sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) cases by humanitarian actors in February 2018, attempts across the sector to address the issue and increase protection against SEA have multiplied. PSEA cuts across the issues of gender, protection, accountability, localisation, power dynamics, faith and culture, and the nexus.

Commitment and Motion to Action on PSEA and Sexual Harassment

ICVA and members organisations reaffirmed their accountability towards affected populations, partners, supporters and public at large at the 2018 ICVA General Assembly. The Commitment and Motion to Action on PSEA and Sexual Harassment also mandates the Secretariat to document and voice the PSEA work, challenges and good practices existing among members and identify recommendations to feed efforts at international, regional and national level.

ICVA recognises the need to ensure that safeguarding is incorporated into every aspect of an organisation’s process and operations, from the support of the Board and the Executive Director to the programmes and partnerships on the ground.  This is reflected in ICVA policy on PSEA.

The framing of ICVA’s response on not just the technical but also the cultural, root causes and political dimensions contributes to solutions-orientated reflections. ICVA is a critical and constructive voice of the new polices and their impact on resourcing and capacity building of smaller organisations.  Our two publications The Long Run to Protection Against Sexual Exploitation and Abuse”  which shares the experiences of ICVA members on PSEA, and our discussion paper on “Humanitarian Ombudsperson” also contribute to the debates.

Safeguarding resources

ICVA page on safeguarding
23 November 2021
Safeguarding resource page
Subject/ Safeguarding_PSEA /
Safeguarding
Description

For more information on our work on safeguarding and PSEA

Consideration of Age

With emergency situations, disasters and conflict increasing worldwide, the suffering and humanitarian needs are driven upwards as well, in particular affecting children. While humanitarian principles require that assistance be delivered impartially to those most in need without discrimination, a “one-size fits-all” emergency response tends to overlook the specific, yet wide-ranging, vulnerabilities of young girls and boys in emergency contexts.

Within ICVA’s diversity work, child rights have become priority streams through joint initiatives and partnerships with members, UN agencies and other networks.

The Rights of the Child

  • UNICEF-NGO Partnership in Humanitarian Action Annual Consultation

Beginning in 2019, ICVA and UNICEF agreed to reach out to the NGO sector to gather their feedback and perceptions of current strengths and challenges in the partnership with UNICEF and to explore pathways to improve such partnership. This resulted in the publication of ICVA’s scoping study on UNICEF-NGOs Partnership in Humanitarian Settings. The acknowledgement of both UNICEF and NGOs that more regular exchanges are needed to enable a partnership fit to respond to the challenges faced by children in today’s humanitarian landscape and the scoping study’s findings, led to the joint organisation by ICVA and UNICEF of the UNICEF-NGO Consultation for Partnership in Humanitarian Settings ‘Enhancing the Culture of Partnership’ in November 2019.

From 17 to 19 November 2020, UNICEF and ICVA hosted the virtual 2020 UNICEF-NGO Partnership in Humanitarian Action Annual Consultation ‘Working Together to Address Emerging Challenges’. It followed up on the commitments endorsed in 2019 and focused on the ongoing efforts to address emerging challenges in 2020, most notably the impacts of COVID-19 on partnerships, decolonialisation of aid, localisation, UNICEF simplified partnership procedures and funding flexibility for NGOs in the context of COVID-19.

  • UNICEF-NGO COVID-19 Briefings

As part of the ongoing dialogue between UNICEF and its partner NGOs and as a follow up to the UNICEF’s and ICVA’s Executive Directors’ communication to partners in April 2020, ICVA and UNICEF, co-jointly with InterAction and SCHR, are convening a series of NGO briefings on Humanitarian partnerships in COVID-19 response. It is aimed at ensuring that the impact of COVID-19 and the response needed are discussed and built upon jointly by UNICEF and NGO partners to ensure a better collaboration on the ground in the collective response for children.

The FAQ, agendas and PowerPoint Presentations and other relevant documents from the UNICEF-NGO COVID-19 briefings can be accessed in the resources section below.

 

Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities

Persons with disabilities are among the most marginalised people in crisis-affected communities and disproportionately affected by conflict and disasters. Facing substantial barriers to accessing assistance, people with disabilities are often not taken into account in humanitarian response or are considered only as recipients of aid and not as actors in the response.

This situation is however changing as people with disabilities have asked humanitarian actors to better consider their rights in intervention. Today a number of key documents and tools support inclusion of persons with disability in humanitarian programming.

IASC Reference Group on the Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action

In 2016, the United Nations Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Working Group agreed on the establishment of a Task Team on the Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action, which, through a large number of consultations with member States, organisations of persons with disabilities and/or in humanitarian action and UN agencies, drafted the Guidelines on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action.  They were endorsed by the IASC Principals in 2019.

Following the launch of the Guidelines, ICVA organised a webinar, entitled, Inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action: what after the guidelines?, to discuss how the Guidelines should be implemented in practice and what actions are needed to translate them into concrete improvements in the daily activities of humanitarian organisations.

A Reference Group was also established to continue to bring together key stakeholders for the implementation of the IASC Guidelines on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities. The group provides support, develops supporting tools and resources and assists in dissemination. ICVA joined the Reference Group and is engaging in its working streams.

Resources on Disability and the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

ICVA
8 June 2020
COVID-19 in humanitarian contexts: no excuses to leave persons with disabilities behind!
Subject/ COVID-19 / Cross-cutting issues /
2021-09-08 (2)
Description

The report aims to illustrate how the COVID-19 crisis triggers disproportionate risks and barriers for men, women, boys and girls with disabilities living in humanitarian settings.

ICVA
19 November 2019
IASC Guidelines, Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action, 2019
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues / Learning /
IASC Guidelines on the Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action, 2019 thumbnail
Description

The guidelines set out essential actions that humanitarian actors must take in order to effectively identify and respond to the needs and rights of persons with disabilities who are most at risk of being left behind in humanitarian settings.

ICVA
10 May 2016
Charter on inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues / Learning /
charter
Description

Key principles to make humanitarian action inclusive of persons with disabilities.

E-learning resource
10 September 2021
Inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action: What next after the guidelines?
Subject/ Cross-cutting issues /
Transformation 5

Proactively Engage in Agile Collaborative Partnerships...

ICVA will leverage its collaborative advantage rooted in our long history and established role to create agile and effective partnerships with diverse stakeholders....
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Overview

ICVA recognises the value and complementarity of other networks, international organisations, other actors in the civil, government and private sectors and that our collective impact can be multiplied by working together. Creating partnerships is a necessity to be transformative in the way we collectively find innovative responses and durable solutions to humanitarian challenges.

Principles of Partnership Page

The Principles of Partnership (Equality, Transparency, Results-Oriented Approach, Responsibility and Complementarity) were an attempt to acknowledge some gaps within the humanitarian reform process, which included neglecting the role of local and national humanitarian response capacity.

Resource page
10 September 2021
Principles of partnership resource page
Subject/ Coordination /
ICVAPoPbannerV6_0
Description

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